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Platform Lifts in Charleston, SC

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30 Years of Making
Your Workday More Productive

They say that working smarter is better than working harder.Why not both?

Whether you're running a high-volume warehouse, overseeing a new construction project, or managing a busy retail establishment, you know that a productive workplace is essential. When it comes to your workplace equipment, you need tools that not only save time and money but are reliable when you need them the most and help your team get the job done right.

At Absolute E-Z Up, we help professionals overcome low productivity by providing the finest stock pickers, tire pickers, and platform lifts in Charleston, SC. If you need more efficiency and more profitability at your job site, you're in the right place. Sure, big-picture processes play an important role in your workplace. However, in our experience, the top cause of low productivity involves wasted time on the job site - avoidable problems that slow down your day-to-day work. And when your day-to-day and overall deadlines aren't achieved, that fault falls on you.

Platform Lifts Charleston, SC

Some of the most common productivity issues
we hear about include:

 Low Level Lift Charleston, SC
  • Low-capacity equipment that requires workers to make multiple trips to transport materials.
  • Unreliable equipment that breaks down again and again.
  • Workers on injury leave because of falls suffered from unsafe ladders or scaffolds.
  • Enlisting more manpower to fill in because you don't have the right equipment to get the job done.

If any of these problems sound familiar to you, you're probably wondering what in the world you can do to get back on track. That's where Absolute E-Z Up comes in - to give you the tools you need to be more productive and efficient, so you have peace of mind knowing your job will finish on time, the right way.

When we founded Absolute E-Z Up (AEUP), we created a plan to deliver safe, reliable work platforms, stock picker forklifts, inclined platform lifts, stair climbers, and material handling products that increase productivity by leaps and bounds. We're not talking a few minutes shaved off here or there. We mean upping your work cycles two to three times what you're used to, coupled with drastically reduced downtime from maintenance and repair.

Sound too good to be true?

Not at Absolute E-Z Up in Charleston, SC.

Contact Us

The Absolute E-Z Up Difference

Our company was founded on three basic values:

 Low Level Access Lifts Charleston, SC

Safety - The Top Time Booster

When workers are injured, they're either placed on light duty or leave until they heal up and get back to work. This leaves you with the conundrum do you hire a new worker (which requires an initial expense) or reassign members of your staff to make up the difference? Obviously, neither situation is optimal. The biggest factor preventing these kinds of frustrating situations is workplace safety, which is why it's our top priority at AEUP. It doesn't matter if you buy a manual platform lift in Charleston, SC, or an electric stock picker. You can rest easy when you purchase equipment from us, knowing that AEUP aerial work platforms and material handling equipment come with the most innovative safety technologies.

A few of those safety mechanisms include:

  • Anti-tilt systems, helping to prevent toppling and turnovers.
  • Built-in pothole protection for driving equipment.
  • Double-foot sensors, which halts the machine from operating unless two feet are planted on the sensors.

Note: Depending on your needs, your machinery may or may not include some of these safety technologies. Please refer to specific product pages for more details.

 Electric Utility Vehicle Charleston, SC

Productivity - Doing More with Less

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

  • Versatile - our equipment is more versatile than other options, giving you the ability to fit into small spaces with a zero turning radius.
  • Faster - our batteries change in only a few hours and can last for dozens if not hundreds of duty cycles.
  • More Efficient - Workers can speed up every part of the workday with special features, attachments, and deck extensions.
  • Lower Costs - You can maintain our equipment at lower costs, which saves you money when you need it most.
 Mini Utility Vehicle Charleston, SC

Reliability - Always There When You Need to Work Hard

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

Industrial Stock Pickers in Charleston, SC

Warehouse picking involves workers pulling (picking) items located on warehouse shelves and moving them down the line for shipment to customers. This kind of work requires a great deal of coordination, organization, and attention to detail. Filling orders under deadlines and time crunches are common. As such, you need a trustworthy stock picker that can boost efficiency and increase production time.

Managers often adjust their picking strategy to be less time-consuming and costly when the real answer might lie with the tools and machinery they're using. At AEUP, we provide the highest-quality stock pickers for your business so that your workers can do the job they need to do as quickly and safely as possible.

With AEUP, you can increase material handling efficiency in a variety of industries and workplaces. We're talking retail, warehouses, factories, and even event venues. The ISP series offers ideal solutions for diverse applications. The models feature a 35% gradeability for greater job-site accessibility.

  Stock Picker Lift Charleston, SC
We offer several pickers for different needs, including:
 Stock Picker Machine Charleston, SC

ISP-7M™

If affordable efficiency is your priority, this is the picker for you. With over a 13-foot working height, it will be the last "ladder" your business will need to use. The ISP-7M is one of the most versatile and affordable stock pickers on the market and is ideal for a variety of workplaces:

  • Airports
  • Warehouses
  • Retail Stores
  • Distribution Centers
  • Educational Buildings
  • Entertainment Venues

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

 Tire Picker Charleston, SC

ISP-11™

Industrial Stock Picker

If maximum versatility modern safety features matter most to you, the ISP-11™ will allow your team to work safer, faster, and with less strain on your workers. With this stock picker, you can increase safety, maximize uptime, and be able to adapt to any floorplan or warehouse layout. Durable, versatile, and low-maintenance, the AEUP ISP-11™ is a self-propelled stock picker that will modernize your material handling process.

  • Drive, rotate and elevate all at the same time. Most of our competitors can only do one of these functions at a time.
  • Closed canopy and damage-resistant carbon bumper.
  • Comes with an aluminum alloy mast cylinder column. That means you don' have to worry about motors or chains to maintain. Add to that a 5-year warranty, and you'll be working smarter and harder for years to come.
  • Our electric material trays are adjustable to any shelf height. Many such trays are not electric and can only adjust in six-inch increments. Instead of adjusting your whole machine due to a three-inch miscalculation, you can save time and frustration with the ISP-11.
  • Our double-foot sensor requires that both of your workers' heels maintain contact with the platform to drive. No more safety nightmares, like hanging over the edge to drive.

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

Platform Lifts Charleston, SC

ISP-11™ TTH

If you're in need of a tire picker in Charleston, SC, our tire transport handler is exactly what you need. Safe, efficient, and versatile, this picker has a working height of over 17 feet, giving you the ability to grab tires on the highest shelves. With tires getting bigger and heavier, it becomes necessary to prevent injuries during all operations involving them. The AEUP ISP-11 TTH lifts both the operator and tires, easily placing them at the desired height while allowing faster and safer performance. As if that weren't enough, this tire transport handler also comes with our stellar 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty.

A Warranty That's on Your Side When You Need It Most

Unlike other companies in our industry, we are proud to say that our warranty comes standard on all our equipment. Stock picker forklift in Charleston, SC? Check. Vertical lifts? Check. Inclined platform lifts? Check. But this isn't any warranty - it's the Absolute E-Z Up platinum manufacturer's warranty, which is why you can trust the quality of AEUP products. Our Platinum Warranties are part of our commitment to value, safety, and quality. When you work with us, we want you to be able to trust that your Absolute E-Z Up equipment is a reliable, smart, long-term asset to your business that saves you money and time.

Our warranty allows our customers to secure their long-term budgets by reducing maintenance and repair costs. Since each piece of machinery is different, your warranty should be customized for the equipment that you need.

 Low Level Lift Charleston, SC
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP Low-Level Access Series

No other elevated work platform or stock picker supplier has anything close to our 5-2-1 warranty. Here's what our warranty guarantees on our low-level access machinery:

  • 5 years on your mast assembly and cylinder
  • 2 years on all other components of your platform or stock picker.
  • 1 year on the lift's battery, which is not pro-rated.
  • Optional AEUP Extended 10-5-1 Warranty Service Coverage (ISPs)
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP EZ Climber Series

Customers choose our E-Z Climber series because it gives them years of dependable service, backed by a warranty that will replace any parts that fail, which minimizes production downtime. We are committed to covering labor costs for the first six months of your purchase. Our E-Z Climber Series warranty guarantees:

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of the machine.
  • 2 years of coverage on your electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the battery, which is not pro-rated.
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on Electric Utility Vehicles

Our electric utility vehicles give you years of dependable service, coupled with a powerful warranty that covers and service that will replace any parts that fail during your warranty period. If a part fails, we'll get it replaced quickly, to minimize downtime from work. Your labor rate is reimbursable and is covered for the first six months.

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of your EUV.
  • 2 years of coverage on the EUV's electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the EUV's battery, which is not pro-rated.

Ready to Get Productive?

At Absolute E-Z, our goal is to provide you with the highest quality transactions and product solutions in the safest manner possible. With the right equipment and mindset, we believe that work can be fun again, and we're here to help make that happen for you and your team. As such, our mission is to be the top provider of stock pickers and other warehouse equipment in Charleston. We make it a point to listen to our customer's needs and do everything in our power to uphold our reputation for excellence.

We'll do so by continuing to honor the commitment we made to ourselves and our customers from the very beginning - earning your respect and loyalty through continuous improvement driven by integrity, teamwork, and innovation.

If you're ready to take your workflow to the next level, we're only a click or call away.

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Low Level Access Lifts Charleston, SC

Latest News in Charleston, SC

SC7 Expedition builds new reef near Charleston after 30 day trip across the state

CHARLESTON, Sc. (WACH) --- The South Carolina 7 Expedition has finished its third trip from the mountains to the sea, across South Carolina.Like each year in the past, they have made it their mission to see and preserve as much of the state as they can.“You know, I hear so many times, ‘Well I didn’t know we had that in South Carolina,’ or, ‘I didn’t know we had a group that was passionate about that here in South Carolina," said South Carolina Lieutenant Governor Pamela Evette.For...

CHARLESTON, Sc. (WACH) --- The South Carolina 7 Expedition has finished its third trip from the mountains to the sea, across South Carolina.

Like each year in the past, they have made it their mission to see and preserve as much of the state as they can.

“You know, I hear so many times, ‘Well I didn’t know we had that in South Carolina,’ or, ‘I didn’t know we had a group that was passionate about that here in South Carolina," said South Carolina Lieutenant Governor Pamela Evette.

For thirty days, they've hiked, biked, and kayaked across the state, exploring the Seven Wonders along the Palmetto Trail.

That's landed them on the shores of Charleston, full of emotion.

“Just how proud I am of the people who participated and how beautiful our state is," said expedition leader Tom Mullikin.

But, before they could celebrate, there was one last job to do.

And that was a couple more miles out to sea.

The mission - to build a smart reef.

This smart reef would be several concrete blocks packed with instruments that would measure the environment right along the coast.

“The reef becomes the observing system and it all connects up to a surficial buoy that telemetries the data out the satellite, to the world beyond," explained Dr. Paul Gayes, the Executive Director of Coastal Carolina University's Center for Marine Wetland Studies.

South Carolina already has nearly 50 artificial reefs along the coastline.

But even still, ocean observations are far and few between.

These new reef in Charleston - the Toadfish Reef - will help fill the gap and improve the science.

“And as this goes in tandem, the forecasts will get better and better and better. Right now, it’s a good thing to have," added Dr. Gayes.

Adding this obstacle offshore will also measure flooding and lower its impacts.

“They always say, in Charleston, three good weddings with a lot of people crying can flood King Street," said Lieutenant Governor Evette. "So, making sure that we are doing something about it and not just kicking this can down the road."

Through choppy seas and strong currents, the mission was a success.

“It was a wonderful, successful day out here building an artificial reef in the lord’s garden," said Dr. Mullikin.

But for Dr. Tom Mullikin, who his peers call a man on the move, there is still plenty of clean ups and work to do before next years expedition.

“We love that people think that we’ve been gifted as stewards of this beautiful environment, but in my mind we’re not really stewards - we’ve borrowed it from our children and our grandchildren," explained Tom. "We want to turn it back to them in even better shape than when we got it.”

Next year, the crew will take on its fourth expedition, giving South Carolinians a chance to enjoy this state - from the mountains to the sea.

This school year, SC districts can no longer use debt collectors to recoup for unpaid meals

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - For the first time this school year, South Carolina schools will no longer be able to use debt collectors to go after students who have not paid for their school meals.The change is now in effect, as some districts across the state returned to the classroom Monday, with the rest following in the coming weeks.The General Assembly passed the change into law during the most rece...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - For the first time this school year, South Carolina schools will no longer be able to use debt collectors to go after students who have not paid for their school meals.

The change is now in effect, as some districts across the state returned to the classroom Monday, with the rest following in the coming weeks.

The General Assembly passed the change into law during the most recent legislative session, through unanimous votes in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and Gov. Henry McMaster signed it in mid-May.

Not every school district in South Carolina had been using debt collectors to recoup for unpaid school meals, and in some districts, every student eats for free.

But in those that were, one organization that pushed for this new law called it a win for struggling South Carolina families.

“This was one form of what we felt is meal-shaming, and we don’t want a child’s hunger to be what’s preventing them from being academically successful,” Wholespire Executive Director Meg Stanley said.

Wholespire is a statewide nonprofit organization that works to provide access to nutritious food and physical activity across South Carolina and advocated for the legislation’s passage after Rep. Wendy Brawley, D – Richland, proposed it.

Stanley said in some districts, debt collectors have not been the only consequence kids have faced for unpaid school meals.

“Like preventing a child from being able to go on certain field trips, maybe even giving them a whole separate meal, which then becomes meal-shaming,” she listed.

Before this legislation became law, the state’s Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office tried to figure out how much the change would cost, as it does for any bill.

But analysts could not determine that figure because, according to their report, most districts did not respond when asked if they used debt collectors and how much they collected.

The report cites a survey the South Carolina Department of Education sent to all 77 traditional districts and two charter districts. Only 13 responded — 12 of which said they do not use debt-collection agencies or that all students receive meals for free, and one of which said the legislation could increase uncollected debt expenses by up to $10,000.

Wholespire conducted a similar survey for which it also didn’t receive a response from every district, but from the information they did obtain, Stanley said they estimated around 120,000 South Carolina students were facing debt collection because of unpaid meals.

But Stanley said a lot of families that were building up lunch debts and could not pay them likely qualify for free or reduced lunches.

She recommended families check in with their districts before the first day of school or in the first week back to see if they qualify and if they need to fill out any paperwork to apply.

“If their family is facing school lunch debt, they more than likely are facing a lot of different struggles,” she said. “Hunger doesn’t need to be what they need to be called out for in school.”

For the last two school years, every student in the country qualified for free meals at school, regardless of their income, because of a federal pandemic-related program.

Congress did not extend that program for this year, so Stanley said some families may not realize they could start to be charged for those meals this year.

In some school districts, every student receives free meals through the federal Community Eligibility Provision because their school is located in a lower-income area.

Stanley said the passage of this new law also presents an opportunity for those districts to look into that program to see if they qualify and would be able to offer free meals to all of their students.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

South Carolina Education Association has concerns about teacher openings across the state

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Center for Educator Recruitment Retention and Advancement reported more than one thousand teacher vacancies across the state and the end of last school year. That number has the South Carolina Education Association concerned about what classrooms will look like this fall.Sherry East, the South Carolina Education Association President, says teacher turnover is a problem she’s been bringing up for years, and this year looks like no exception.East says she and other members of the...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Center for Educator Recruitment Retention and Advancement reported more than one thousand teacher vacancies across the state and the end of last school year. That number has the South Carolina Education Association concerned about what classrooms will look like this fall.

Sherry East, the South Carolina Education Association President, says teacher turnover is a problem she’s been bringing up for years, and this year looks like no exception.

East says she and other members of the association are attending new teacher orientations across the state and hearing about lots of openings, that haven’t been filled as of August.

“So we were very concerned with that number then, because we knew a lot of teachers were holding out until June, and they were going to quit. We were hearing as a lot of our members saying that they weren’t coming back. We’ve been out in the field orientation last couple of weeks that we’re hearing for the normal numbers that are out there,” East says.

Last fall, the annual recruitment and retention report cited more than one thousand vacancies and the number stayed that high in the spring report update as well.

East says that means, throughout the year, substitutes and administrative staff would often fill in to get through the day. East spent August 1st in Aiken County at a teacher orientation.

Charleston County and Berkeley County Schools currently have vacancies posted for substitute teachers for the upcoming school year on Kelly Education Services.

In Berkeley County the district is currently are trying to fill 132 Teacher Vacancies and 10 Teacher assistant Vacancies. To become a Substitute teacher you need a High School Diploma with additional training. The pay is based on your highest level of education. A High School Diploma earns $130 a day, 60 college credit hours earns $150 a day and a certified teacher earns $175 a day.

Kat Low is the President of the Berkeley County Education Association chapter. She echoes East in her thoughts on the shortage as a problem that grew over time.

“It has been a number of years now that teachers have been basically leaving the workforce and we don’t have the teachers to fill those positions, you know, and on top of that, in areas like our Tri County, Dorchester, Berkeley in Charleston, you know, we have to remember that we are growing so we’re a growing population. We need more teachers than we’ve ever needed before,” Low says.

Delegates approved the South Carolina Education Association goals for 2023 in the last week of July. It has goals of fully funding public schools, providing competitive compensation, improving recruitment and retention, increase learning time and invest in school safety.

Advocates with South Carolina Education Association says the teacher shortage across the state is rooted in the state funding level.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston puts up plaque where slaves were beaten, punished

Until recently, the story of the Charleston Work House received little recognition in the city's collective memory.That changed a little when Mayor John Tecklenburg unveiled a plaque detailing its past."I don't know of a more horrific thing than what this city did," Tecklenburg said through tears at a July 13 ceremony. "It's shameful."The Charleston Work House, was located next to The Old Charleston Jail on Magazine street. It was a place where slave owners could pay the city to punish enslaved people...

Until recently, the story of the Charleston Work House received little recognition in the city's collective memory.

That changed a little when Mayor John Tecklenburg unveiled a plaque detailing its past.

"I don't know of a more horrific thing than what this city did," Tecklenburg said through tears at a July 13 ceremony. "It's shameful."

The Charleston Work House, was located next to The Old Charleston Jail on Magazine street. It was a place where slave owners could pay the city to punish enslaved people.

Until this week, the empty lot has had little markings or signage. But in its time, it was a source of brutal mistreatment of enslaved people as well as a source of revenue for the city of Charleston. The plaque erected July 13 includes research reviewed by the Charleston Commission on History.

The property began as housing for the White paupers in 1738, the plaque reads. But soon it was expanded to add the Work House. For a price, city employees whipped enslaved people up to 40 times per week. For an added cost, they would literally throw salt on the wounds.

Slave owners who ran late on their bills were charged extra and could end up forfeiting their enslaved person to the city. An image of one of these invoices is displayed on the plaque. Charleston could then force that person into labor for the city or sell them and put the profit back into the city's coffers.

The legacy of the lot has long been obscured. When Tecklenburg heard about it from Christine King, who leads tours at the Old Slave Mart Museum, he said he knew that more awareness was needed.

"It's the right thing for us to tell even these difficult stories from the past to help unfold where we go into the future," Tecklenburg said.

The Work House was also a place of resistance. Denmark Vesey was detained there. Vesey was a formerly enslaved man who bought his freedom and worked as a carpenter. Some years later, another enslaved man, Nicholas Kelly, was held at there as well, the plaque states.

Both men attempted to lead slave rebellions and were sentenced to death as a result.

Tecklenburg defended Vesey's legacy in his speech, saying the Charleston of the 1820s was never capable of giving a Black person a fair trial. He said his legacy needs defending at time when some still refuse to see him as anything other than an insurrectionist.

After Vesey's death, he became a martyr to Black residents, a freedom fighter whose legacy inspired generations to fight for equality, no matter how grave the risks. For Whites, he loomed a would-be murderer, a terrorist intent on killing them all.

It's a reputation that was formed during his trial at the Work House. Recognizing where it came from is crucial, Tecklenburg said.

King helped lead the effort to erect the sign at the mayor's request. But she didn't see the unveiling of the plaque July 13 as an event that was hers to claim alone, pointing to her formerly enslaved great-grandfather and all other ancestors.

"When I say 'ancestors' I mean everyone," she said. "This affected every Black person, not just those who were enslaved. For the ones who got their freedom, their freedom wasn't really free. There were laws to limit it."

In his recognition speech, Tecklenburg connected the site's new plaque to his personal endeavor to reckon with the ways in which the city's foundation was built on slavery and what to do about it now.

In 2018, City Council voted to issue a formal apology for its role in slavery. The Work House, which the city operated and profited from, is a prime example of that tie, Tecklenburg said.

This past February, City Council voted to establish a racial conciliation commission, later renamed the Human Affairs Commission.

Its goal is to identify city policies that can be changed to lessen the racial disparities seen across so much of public life in Charleston, from education access to health outcomes and financial stability. While city commissions can't pass ordinances on their own, they are tasked with making recommendations to City Council.

None of the steps have come easily. The apology for slavery was approved in a 7-5 vote. The Human Affairs commission faced a coordinated campaign against it.

This resistance to acknowledging slavery's ties to the present day is why the plaque was a necessary step in the right direction, Pastor Fred Wilkins said at the unveiling. His church, Spirit and Truth Southside Baptist Church, is around the corner.

"In a lot of ways we are still recovering from those times and the things that happened, even today," Wilkins said.

400-Year-Old Angel Oak Tree in Charleston, SC is a Must-See

Have you heard of the Angel Oak Tree in Charleston, SC? The 400-year-old live oak on Johns Island is well worth the visit and should be on your list of things to do in the Charleston area. I had been to the Angel Oak Tree once before but I could only see it through the fence because I happened to go on a holiday weekend when it was closed. When I was back in Charleston, SC, I was determined to make the stop to see the incredible tree. After all, I had seen numerous photos of it, even in places as far as a museum in Florida! I...

Have you heard of the Angel Oak Tree in Charleston, SC? The 400-year-old live oak on Johns Island is well worth the visit and should be on your list of things to do in the Charleston area.

I had been to the Angel Oak Tree once before but I could only see it through the fence because I happened to go on a holiday weekend when it was closed. When I was back in Charleston, SC, I was determined to make the stop to see the incredible tree. After all, I had seen numerous photos of it, even in places as far as a museum in Florida! I had to see it for myself.

History of the Angel Oak Tree

Arborists estimate the oak tree is between 300 – 400 years old. To say it’s enormous is an understatement. It’s likely the largest live oak tree east of the Mississippi River.

The tree has a diameter of 25.5 feet and is 65 feet tall, providing more than 17,000 square feet of shade, which felt really nice on the hot July day we went. It’s a historical site and is deemed a “Lowcountry Treasure.” I’d agree. Records indicate the tree was initially owned by Abraham Waight starting in 1717 and stayed in his family for four generations. It became part of a marriage contract between Martha W.T. Angel and Justus Angel, hence the name of the tree I assume.

While the tree does grow up, it also grows outwards. The branches and limbs are massively heavy so you’ll notice some of them are held up by wooden beams.

Today, the tree and land are technically owned by the City of Charleston and part of their park system. There’s a gift shop on site and parking and entry are free.

Visiting the Angel Oak Tree

To get to the parking area of the oak tree, you have to drive on a really bumpy road and there is limited parking. People usually don’t spend a lot of time there so parking spots will open quickly and just go slow on the bumpy road. You don’t need a 4×4 and we saw plenty of compact cars there.

Let’s talk about the rules of visiting the tree. Leashed pets are allowed but not within 100 feet of the tree. There are signs about where you can go with them. Secondly, as you may imagine, there is no climbing, sitting, marking, or standing on the tree. No food or drinks are allowed near it as well as tripods, blankets, and props. There are plenty of picnic tables and benches in the park if you’d like to sit and rest while there.

Weddings and special events and professional photography are allowed but permits are required. Contact the City of Charleston to arrange for those: 843.724.7327.

Make sure to double-check the hours before you go (I didn’t the first time I went and it was closed!). Hours are Monday – Saturday 9 am – 5 pm, Sunday 1-5 pm; closed holidays. The last entry is at 4:50 pm. There are port-a-potties on site but it’s probably better to go at a nearby gas station before you get to the park.

What It’s Like at the Angel Oak Tree

I didn’t research the history of the tree before we went so my kids were thinking that the tree should look like an angel and they decided it didn’t. I could see it though, with the limbs spread out and the trunk resembling a body. Others may think of the mythical creature Medusa with her multi-snake hair.

Regardless, let me say that visiting Angel Oak® was really special. There’s a peace surrounding it that I think maybe comes with historical places. I felt the same when I visited the ruins of the Old Sheldon Church further south near Beaufort, SC.

I’m not sure exactly what it is that makes this spot so special but I was thinking of the stories this tree could tell if it could speak, of the battles waged near it, of the people who sat under its shade maybe reading or writing documents and books we still read today. Charleston itself is so steeped in history that I think some of that spills into this particular spot.

I think it’s worth the 10 or 15 minutes you’d spend wandering under the shade of the massive branches that stretch many feet around you and gaze at the wonder of nature that is the Angel Oak Tree.

Things to do Nearby

Charleston is full of adventure for families! Just 10 minutes down the road from the Angel Oak Tree is the Charleston Aqua Park, a super fun place with an over-water ropes course and floating obstacle course.

Downtown Charleston is about 20 minutes away and Mt. Pleasant, Sullivan’s Island, and Folly Beach are all nearby as well. For more info to help you plan your next trip to the low country, check out the Kidding Around Travel Guide to Charleston, SC: Things to Do, Where to Stay, and Places to Eat

3688 Angel Oak Road, Charleston, SC Hours are Monday – Saturday 9 am – 5 pm, Sunday 1-5 pm; closed holidays

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