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Platform Lifts in James Island, SC

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30 Years of Making
Your Workday More Productive

They say that working smarter is better than working harder.Why not both?

Whether you're running a high-volume warehouse, overseeing a new construction project, or managing a busy retail establishment, you know that a productive workplace is essential. When it comes to your workplace equipment, you need tools that not only save time and money but are reliable when you need them the most and help your team get the job done right.

At Absolute E-Z Up, we help professionals overcome low productivity by providing the finest stock pickers, tire pickers, and platform lifts in James Island, SC. If you need more efficiency and more profitability at your job site, you're in the right place. Sure, big-picture processes play an important role in your workplace. However, in our experience, the top cause of low productivity involves wasted time on the job site - avoidable problems that slow down your day-to-day work. And when your day-to-day and overall deadlines aren't achieved, that fault falls on you.

Platform Lifts James Island, SC

Some of the most common productivity issues
we hear about include:

 Low Level Lift James Island, SC
  • Low-capacity equipment that requires workers to make multiple trips to transport materials.
  • Unreliable equipment that breaks down again and again.
  • Workers on injury leave because of falls suffered from unsafe ladders or scaffolds.
  • Enlisting more manpower to fill in because you don't have the right equipment to get the job done.

If any of these problems sound familiar to you, you're probably wondering what in the world you can do to get back on track. That's where Absolute E-Z Up comes in - to give you the tools you need to be more productive and efficient, so you have peace of mind knowing your job will finish on time, the right way.

When we founded Absolute E-Z Up (AEUP), we created a plan to deliver safe, reliable work platforms, stock picker forklifts, inclined platform lifts, stair climbers, and material handling products that increase productivity by leaps and bounds. We're not talking a few minutes shaved off here or there. We mean upping your work cycles two to three times what you're used to, coupled with drastically reduced downtime from maintenance and repair.

Sound too good to be true?

Not at Absolute E-Z Up in James Island, SC.

Contact Us

The Absolute E-Z Up Difference

Our company was founded on three basic values:

 Low Level Access Lifts James Island, SC

Safety - The Top Time Booster

When workers are injured, they're either placed on light duty or leave until they heal up and get back to work. This leaves you with the conundrum do you hire a new worker (which requires an initial expense) or reassign members of your staff to make up the difference? Obviously, neither situation is optimal. The biggest factor preventing these kinds of frustrating situations is workplace safety, which is why it's our top priority at AEUP. It doesn't matter if you buy a manual platform lift in James Island, SC, or an electric stock picker. You can rest easy when you purchase equipment from us, knowing that AEUP aerial work platforms and material handling equipment come with the most innovative safety technologies.

A few of those safety mechanisms include:

  • Anti-tilt systems, helping to prevent toppling and turnovers.
  • Built-in pothole protection for driving equipment.
  • Double-foot sensors, which halts the machine from operating unless two feet are planted on the sensors.

Note: Depending on your needs, your machinery may or may not include some of these safety technologies. Please refer to specific product pages for more details.

 Electric Utility Vehicle James Island, SC

Productivity - Doing More with Less

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

  • Versatile - our equipment is more versatile than other options, giving you the ability to fit into small spaces with a zero turning radius.
  • Faster - our batteries change in only a few hours and can last for dozens if not hundreds of duty cycles.
  • More Efficient - Workers can speed up every part of the workday with special features, attachments, and deck extensions.
  • Lower Costs - You can maintain our equipment at lower costs, which saves you money when you need it most.
 Mini Utility Vehicle James Island, SC

Reliability - Always There When You Need to Work Hard

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

Industrial Stock Pickers in James Island, SC

Warehouse picking involves workers pulling (picking) items located on warehouse shelves and moving them down the line for shipment to customers. This kind of work requires a great deal of coordination, organization, and attention to detail. Filling orders under deadlines and time crunches are common. As such, you need a trustworthy stock picker that can boost efficiency and increase production time.

Managers often adjust their picking strategy to be less time-consuming and costly when the real answer might lie with the tools and machinery they're using. At AEUP, we provide the highest-quality stock pickers for your business so that your workers can do the job they need to do as quickly and safely as possible.

With AEUP, you can increase material handling efficiency in a variety of industries and workplaces. We're talking retail, warehouses, factories, and even event venues. The ISP series offers ideal solutions for diverse applications. The models feature a 35% gradeability for greater job-site accessibility.

  Stock Picker Lift James Island, SC
We offer several pickers for different needs, including:
 Stock Picker Machine James Island, SC

ISP-7M™

If affordable efficiency is your priority, this is the picker for you. With over a 13-foot working height, it will be the last "ladder" your business will need to use. The ISP-7M is one of the most versatile and affordable stock pickers on the market and is ideal for a variety of workplaces:

  • Airports
  • Warehouses
  • Retail Stores
  • Distribution Centers
  • Educational Buildings
  • Entertainment Venues

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

 Tire Picker James Island, SC

ISP-11™

Industrial Stock Picker

If maximum versatility modern safety features matter most to you, the ISP-11™ will allow your team to work safer, faster, and with less strain on your workers. With this stock picker, you can increase safety, maximize uptime, and be able to adapt to any floorplan or warehouse layout. Durable, versatile, and low-maintenance, the AEUP ISP-11™ is a self-propelled stock picker that will modernize your material handling process.

  • Drive, rotate and elevate all at the same time. Most of our competitors can only do one of these functions at a time.
  • Closed canopy and damage-resistant carbon bumper.
  • Comes with an aluminum alloy mast cylinder column. That means you don' have to worry about motors or chains to maintain. Add to that a 5-year warranty, and you'll be working smarter and harder for years to come.
  • Our electric material trays are adjustable to any shelf height. Many such trays are not electric and can only adjust in six-inch increments. Instead of adjusting your whole machine due to a three-inch miscalculation, you can save time and frustration with the ISP-11.
  • Our double-foot sensor requires that both of your workers' heels maintain contact with the platform to drive. No more safety nightmares, like hanging over the edge to drive.

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

Platform Lifts James Island, SC

ISP-11™ TTH

If you're in need of a tire picker in James Island, SC, our tire transport handler is exactly what you need. Safe, efficient, and versatile, this picker has a working height of over 17 feet, giving you the ability to grab tires on the highest shelves. With tires getting bigger and heavier, it becomes necessary to prevent injuries during all operations involving them. The AEUP ISP-11 TTH lifts both the operator and tires, easily placing them at the desired height while allowing faster and safer performance. As if that weren't enough, this tire transport handler also comes with our stellar 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty.

A Warranty That's on Your Side When You Need It Most

Unlike other companies in our industry, we are proud to say that our warranty comes standard on all our equipment. Stock picker forklift in James Island, SC? Check. Vertical lifts? Check. Inclined platform lifts? Check. But this isn't any warranty - it's the Absolute E-Z Up platinum manufacturer's warranty, which is why you can trust the quality of AEUP products. Our Platinum Warranties are part of our commitment to value, safety, and quality. When you work with us, we want you to be able to trust that your Absolute E-Z Up equipment is a reliable, smart, long-term asset to your business that saves you money and time.

Our warranty allows our customers to secure their long-term budgets by reducing maintenance and repair costs. Since each piece of machinery is different, your warranty should be customized for the equipment that you need.

 Low Level Lift James Island, SC
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP Low-Level Access Series

No other elevated work platform or stock picker supplier has anything close to our 5-2-1 warranty. Here's what our warranty guarantees on our low-level access machinery:

  • 5 years on your mast assembly and cylinder
  • 2 years on all other components of your platform or stock picker.
  • 1 year on the lift's battery, which is not pro-rated.
  • Optional AEUP Extended 10-5-1 Warranty Service Coverage (ISPs)
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP EZ Climber Series

Customers choose our E-Z Climber series because it gives them years of dependable service, backed by a warranty that will replace any parts that fail, which minimizes production downtime. We are committed to covering labor costs for the first six months of your purchase. Our E-Z Climber Series warranty guarantees:

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of the machine.
  • 2 years of coverage on your electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the battery, which is not pro-rated.
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on Electric Utility Vehicles

Our electric utility vehicles give you years of dependable service, coupled with a powerful warranty that covers and service that will replace any parts that fail during your warranty period. If a part fails, we'll get it replaced quickly, to minimize downtime from work. Your labor rate is reimbursable and is covered for the first six months.

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of your EUV.
  • 2 years of coverage on the EUV's electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the EUV's battery, which is not pro-rated.

Ready to Get Productive?

At Absolute E-Z, our goal is to provide you with the highest quality transactions and product solutions in the safest manner possible. With the right equipment and mindset, we believe that work can be fun again, and we're here to help make that happen for you and your team. As such, our mission is to be the top provider of stock pickers and other warehouse equipment in James Island. We make it a point to listen to our customer's needs and do everything in our power to uphold our reputation for excellence.

We'll do so by continuing to honor the commitment we made to ourselves and our customers from the very beginning - earning your respect and loyalty through continuous improvement driven by integrity, teamwork, and innovation.

If you're ready to take your workflow to the next level, we're only a click or call away.

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Low Level Access Lifts James Island, SC

Latest News in James Island, SC

James Island residents express concern over proposed development filling wetlands

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up t...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.

The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.

Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up to his home. He says he is worried about a lot of things, including stormwater runoff and traffic.

“They want to fill in the wetlands, and they’re going to have to cut down some trees, so if it rains, where is the water going to go? It’s going to come on our families, it’s going to be in our backyards and we’re going to be flooded under,” Payton says.

He also has concerns about how the amount of people moving in would affect traffic and the livability of his neighborhood.

“I say each unit is two cars, that’s 140, where are they going?” Payton asks “People have to go to work in the morning, how long will it take for people to come down Grimball Road Extension?”

He says he wants to attend a public hearing about the plans.

“We want to make sure that if they are going to build something, that they do it correctly,” Payton says.

The applicant developers are requesting to fill a little less than a quarter of an acre of wetlands. That filling would not have “a substantial adverse impact,” according to an Army Corps of Engineers initial study. The study found the filling would have ‘no effect’ on any federally endangered or threatened species.

The applicant is asking to fill .2 acres to construct a commercial parking lot and the other .03 to install a stormwater drainage structure, according to a June 24th, 2022, Army Corps of Engineers’ notice.

The report says the applicant will preserve the remaining .75 acres of wetlands to compensate for any impacts.

The Army Corps of Engineers is taking comments on the project through Monday, July 11. Operators of the ‘Save James Island’ Facebook page are encouraging people who are opposed to sending an email reading in part:

“I oppose the filling of any wetlands (no matter how ‘small’)…this historic area is plagued by flooding and drainage issues, and the preservation of natural wetlands and trees are our best and least-costly defense. Pleas hold a public hearing so the Army Corps of Engineers has ALL of the information, including the voice of the people who live here.”

The applicant appeared before Charleston City Technical Review Committee in April and is working to resolve some of the comments before coming back with a revised plan for the development.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

2 city-wide school supply drives accepting donations

The city of Charleston will be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 3. Local nonprofit I Serve with Joy will also be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 24. Both efforts offer designated drop-off points throughout the Charleston area.The city will give out the donations it receives during its annual Back to School First Day Festival at the Gaillard Center and the South Carolina Aquarium 1-4 p.m. on Aug. 7.“The festival is about community partnerships and is a way for the community to celebrate education a...

The city of Charleston will be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 3. Local nonprofit I Serve with Joy will also be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 24. Both efforts offer designated drop-off points throughout the Charleston area.

The city will give out the donations it receives during its annual Back to School First Day Festival at the Gaillard Center and the South Carolina Aquarium 1-4 p.m. on Aug. 7.

“The festival is about community partnerships and is a way for the community to celebrate education and show the students and families that we care about their education and want them to be successful,” said Mindy Sturm, director of the Mayor’s Office for Children, Youth & Families.

First Day Festival is a longstanding event the city started in 2003 to celebrate the new school year by providing families with supplies and information they need in preparation for the year. Attendees can enjoy food from the Lowcountry Food Bank and free admission to the aquarium.

“It’s a fun day where families can come together and receive free school supplies and take part in the free farmers market that the Lowcountry Food Bank provides,” Sturm said. “We will have about 75 community groups and organizations there with information to hand out about resources and services in the community.”

The community is invited to be part of the event by hosting a school supply drive or donating at the designated drop off points. For a full list of drop off locations visit bit.ly/CHSFirstDayFestival.

Local nonprofit I Serve With Joy is offering another opportunity to donate school supplies for the 2022-2023 school year with its first annual Back 2 School Drive held through Aug. 24.

I Serve with Joy connects local charities with businesses that are passionate about helping underprivileged students. The organization will accept backpacks and supplies at various drop off locations until Aug. 24 to fill over 250 backpacks with supplies that will then be donated to school giveaways across South Carolina.

I Serve With Joy has several drop-off locations in Hanahan, North Charleston, downtown Charleston and Summerville. Visit iservewithjoy.org for a full list of donation locations and more information

First Day Festival donation drop-off locations: Aug. 3 deadline

City of Charleston offices at 75 Calhoun St., Suite 3700. DowntownCity of Charleston offices at 823 Meeting St. DowntownDaniel Island Recreation Center at 160 Fairbanks Drive. Daniel IslandJames Island Recreation Center at 1088 Quail Drive. James IslandArthur Christopher Community Center at 265 Fishburne St. DowntownBees Landing Recreation Center at 1580 Ashley Gardens Blvd. West AshleyUnited Bank downtown location: 288 Meeting St.United Bank West Ashley location: 884 Orleans RoadUnited Bank James Island location: 430 Folly RoadUnited Bank Mount Pleasant location: 1492 Stuart Engels Blvd.United Bank Summerville location: 200 North Cedar St.

New facilities focus on career readiness at James Island Charter High School

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A shiny new basketball gym, an indoor-outdoor building construction classroom, a commercial kitchen and an entire wing reserved for health education are just some of the features of the two new buildings at James Island Charter High School. The $25 million development is the last major project in the Charleston County School District’s Phase Four Capital Programs plan approved and paid for by a referendum in 2016.The new buildings consist of a Career Technology Education center and a new competitive gym...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A shiny new basketball gym, an indoor-outdoor building construction classroom, a commercial kitchen and an entire wing reserved for health education are just some of the features of the two new buildings at James Island Charter High School. The $25 million development is the last major project in the Charleston County School District’s Phase Four Capital Programs plan approved and paid for by a referendum in 2016.

The new buildings consist of a Career Technology Education center and a new competitive gym. Inside the CTE building, students will find classes aimed at allowing them to achieve a Completers Status by developing hands-on skills. The Completers Status opens the door for students to get a leg up in college or to simply enter the workforce straight out of high school. Principal Timothy Thorn says it’s all about giving students options and opportunities.

“The thing behind Career Technology Education is that you can get a completers status and go into the workforce and earn a living wage,” Thorn said. “You don’t need to go to college to make a lot of money or to do well early on. You can always increase your credentials over time as well. You can go into the workforce, begin to provide for yourself, have some success and then maybe find the path you want to go down. Either way, it provides a vehicle for kids to earn skills and credentials to help them be successful in life.”

Students can study culinary arts in a commercial kitchen or building construction in an indoor-outdoor facility filled with the same machines found on an actual worksite. Of course, there are state-of-the-art computer labs for classes aimed at teaching students coding, programming and engineering as well.

Perhaps most impressive are the rooms dedicated to health sciences. Before entering classrooms, students walk past a nurse station designed to simulate the triage area of a hospital. Across the hall, half a dozen medical beds line a wall in a room that mirrors what you’d expect to see at any medical school. It’s the same equipment used by medical students, down to the patient dummies. Here students learn the basics of care and medical administration.

“We’re ecstatic. The facilities are gorgeous and state of the art,” Thorn said. “It’s very exciting and I can’t wait to get the kids in there.”

Next door, the gym has more than enough capacity to hold the entire student body and has everything you’d expect to see in a high school gym. The gym is branded head to toe in school colors and even the new weight room houses dumbbells with the image of the school’s mascot – a trojan warrior – painted on the sides. While the building is designed for athletics, it also doubles as a classroom.

“Every space has its purpose and supports our academic mission and hopefully helps kids find their paths going forward,” Thorn said.

Students studying sports medicine, for example, have classrooms adjacent to the gym, while even the student store located next to the trophy case has an educational opportunity for business students.

“The school store for example. It’s about learning how to do inventory, run a store, the debits and the credits and taking care of the cashier and patrons and serving the public, so learning all those aspects of life skills and employment skills are critical,” Thorn said.

Students will be able to start using building buildings when they return to school in August.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

High school football schedule changes possible due to artificial surface project delays

Collin Liggett isn’t setting up any contingency plans just yet.But the first-year St. James athletics director and the Sharks football team are all probably crossing their fingers just the same.The installation of synthetic turf at the stadium is slightly behind schedule, thanks to some weather delays over the course of the last two months. Liggett said the project is still slated to be completed prior to St. James’ regular-season opener against Waccamaw on Aug. 19.However, any further delays could change tha...

Collin Liggett isn’t setting up any contingency plans just yet.

But the first-year St. James athletics director and the Sharks football team are all probably crossing their fingers just the same.

The installation of synthetic turf at the stadium is slightly behind schedule, thanks to some weather delays over the course of the last two months. Liggett said the project is still slated to be completed prior to St. James’ regular-season opener against Waccamaw on Aug. 19.

However, any further delays could change that in a hurry.

“That’s a bridge we’ll cross when we get closer to time,” Liggett said. “We’re planning on playing on the 19th here at St. James. … I think we’re behind, but not by much. If we get some good weather, we’ll be good.”

As of Monday morning, it appeared as if the necessary supplies — including the base layer of the stone, the fabric that lies atop the rock and even the rolled turf had been delivered. However, the drainage line encircling the field was only partially completed and that base layer of rock — which Liggett said was set to be completed this week — was still in piles down the middle of the field.

If that stage is finished this week, the crew will then have approximately two weeks to roll out the turf, set it properly and then begin the stenciling process from end zone to end zone.

That process took upwards of two weeks to get Socastee’s field game ready. The one advantage St. James has, Liggett said, is that the similarly timed projects at Carolina Forest and Socastee are closer to completion (Loris is already practicing on its new turf), so more resources can be devoted to finishing up the Sharks’ field inside of the next three weeks.

Meanwhile, it’s down to a matter of days before Socastee can start taking advantage of its new digs.

Braves Athletics Director Josh Vinson said Monday that his team will practice on that school’s field on Wednesday to prepare for Thursday’s scheduled scrimmage against Georgetown. Vinson noted that the visiting bleachers are set to be completed that afternoon, although they’ll still need to be cleaned prior to anyone utilizing them.

Oddly enough, Socastee is the only one of the four district schools that did not schedule a Week 0 home game.

“That’s one of the reasons I scheduled away,” Vinson said. “I know they said we were going to be good, but I didn’t know.”

The Braves will head to North Myrtle Beach for the season opener on Aug. 19 and look to be in good shape for their Week 1 home game against Class 2A power Silver Bluff. Loris should also be good to go for its season opener against Green Sea Floyds.

Carolina Forest is scheduled to play host to West Brunswick (N.C.), something that should still be doable as the Panthers’ turf is scheduled to be rolled out in the next few days.

However, a solution for any more potential delays at St. James isn’t quite as automatic. The Sharks’ Week 0 opponent, Waccamaw, is also in the final stages of its own artificial surface project. Warriors coach Amondre Johnson said Monday that his field is scheduled to be game ready by Aug. 16 or 17.

Again, though, that’s up to Mother Nature.

NO WAITING AROUND

The immediacy of preseason scrimmages is going to be a bit of a shock, given that the last two football seasons have included fewer dry runs than ever before.

Beginning Thursday, area teams will all be in action in scrimmages. They’ll all then turn around and play again Monday in another scrimmage before the nine Horry County programs and Waccamaw head to Coastal Carolina University’s Brooks Stadium for the CNB Kickoff Classic on Aug. 12.

Monday’s practices were the first ones in shells — helmets and shoulder pads — for teams in South Carolina. They’re then allowed to move to full-pad practices on Wednesday and hold their first scrimmages Thursday.

HORRY COUNTY PRESEASON SCRIMMAGE SCHEDULE

AUG. 4

Myrtle Beach at Loris, 6:30 p.m.

Georgetown at Socastee, 6 p.m.

East Clarendon at Aynor, 6 p.m.

St. James at Andrews, 6 p.m.

Lamar at North Myrtle Beach, 6:30 p.m.

Carolina Forest, James Island at Berkeley

Green Sea Floyds at Lakewood

AUG. 8

Wando at Myrtle Beach, 6:30 p.m.

Conway at Wilson

Waccamaw at Socastee, 6 p.m.

Marion at Loris, 6 p.m.

Aynor at Andrews

St. James at Green Sea Floyds, 6 p.m.

North Myrtle Beach, Central Pageland at Lamar, 6:30 p.m.

Carolina Forest at Goose Creek

AUG. 12

CNB Kickoff Classic, Coastal Carolina University, 7 p.m.

Game Schedule

Myrtle Beach-Socastee

Waccamaw-Conway

Loris-Carolina Forest

North Myrtle Beach-St. James

Green Sea Floyds-Aynor

Lawsuits over Charleston condos’ construction issues block owners from refinancing

Many Charleston-area condominium complexes have been in lawsuits over construction defects, and for some owners and potential buyers that’s meant missing out on super-low mortgage rates.Linzie Davis is one of those condo owners. In 2021 she expected to finally secure a low-interest mortgage on her condo at The Peninsula on James Island.Mortgage interest rates were near record lows, and Davis wanted to replace an adjustable-rate mortgage that had been her only option when she bought her home in 2017 due to ongoing litigati...

Many Charleston-area condominium complexes have been in lawsuits over construction defects, and for some owners and potential buyers that’s meant missing out on super-low mortgage rates.

Linzie Davis is one of those condo owners. In 2021 she expected to finally secure a low-interest mortgage on her condo at The Peninsula on James Island.

Mortgage interest rates were near record lows, and Davis wanted to replace an adjustable-rate mortgage that had been her only option when she bought her home in 2017 due to ongoing litigation.

By 2021, the 300-condo complex on Daniel Ellis Drive had been through two lawsuits over construction defects. Davis thought that was all in the past, and was assured by the complex’s management company that there was no litigation going on. She applied for a 30-year mortgage when average interest rates were around 3 percent, and she locked in her rate in November.

Unbeknownst to Davis, her condo association had filed another lawsuit, and when her lender, SouthState Bank, learned that in January, they declined to process her loan.

“We totally missed the boat,” Davis said. “I had all these emails from (the condo) association saying there was no litigation.”

The issue is, most banks write mortgage loans and then sell them to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the federally created entities that buy mortgages so that banks will have more money to loan. And Fannie and Freddie won’t buy loans for properties in litigation.

In the six months since Davis’ loan was rejected, mortgage interest rates have nearly doubled. The adjustable rate mortgage Davis currently has is set to change in 2024, with a potential interest rate as high as 9.125 percent, and her monthly payments could soar.

While Davis’ experience — being incorrectly told that there was no litigation involving her condo complex — may be unusual, the inability to get a fixed-rate mortgage is a problem facing anyone who owns or hopes to buy a condo that’s involved in a lawsuit.

For condo owners, it makes sense to sue when buildings are found to have construction-related defects because someone will have to pay to repair them. Lawsuits can take years, though, and while they’re going on, the owners and potential buyers find it difficult, if not impossible, to get a conventional mortgage loan.

“The problem is the existence of the suit,” said Brian Beatty, a top Charleston area real estate agent with a weekend radio show on WTMA-AM. “On one hand, they are doing it for the benefit of the owners, but the inability of financing reduces the potential buyers.”

Beatty had his own condo-in-litigation experience, and it illustrates how prices can plunge and rebound.

He bought a condo at Point James on James Island as an investment before the Great Recession. Construction defects spurred a lawsuit, housing prices tumbled during the recession and Beatty said he watched his $140,000 condo become worth about $40,000.

Later, he said, the litigation was resolved and the housing market recovered, and he was able to sell it this year for $188,000.

Dozens of Charleston-area condo and townhouse developments have been in litigation, some of them more than once. Most cases have involved water intrusion due to improper window and porch construction, sometimes leading to mold and termite issues, or even life-threatening structural problems.

Repeat lawsuits have typically involved disputes over the quality of repairs done to fix the construction defects that spurred the original litigation, as is the case with The Peninsula.

Pelican Pointe, another James Island condo complex, is among those that have gone back to court and is still in litigation.

Owen Tyler, broker-in-charge at The Cassina Group, said there’s no easy way to learn which condo and townhome complexes may be in an active lawsuit without looking up court records. Sellers are required to disclose such litigation, but such disclosures only come after an offer has been made.

Beatty said condo-shoppers should look for real estate agents who have been working in the area long enough to be familiar with the history of condominium complexes.

For potential buyers, condos and townhomes are some of the most affordable options for home ownership — but only if mortgage loans are available.

For condo owners including Davis, litigation has meant having to watch in frustration as super-low mortgage interest rates came and went.

For someone borrowing $200,000 for 30 years, the difference in monthly payments between a 3 percent interest rate and a 6 percent rate is $356 — more than $4,270 extra every year.

At least for condo owners, litigation has a potential upside: the prospect of winning large settlements to pay for repairs that the owners would otherwise have to fund.

At Pelican Pointe, for example, the owners of all 84 condos were asked in 2019 to pay nearly $60,000 each to fund repairs including termite damage that prompted a city-ordered temporary evacuation. A lawsuit related to the termite damage, and a lapsed termite insurance contract, is ongoing.

Charleston County court records show The Peninsula condos were in litigation over construction defects from April 2006 to March 2011, resulting in a more than $10 million settlement.

From November 2014 to April 2018, the condo association and two companies involved in repairs were defendants in a suit brought by several condo owners, which was dismissed with undisclosed terms. And in September the condo association sued companies and insurers involved in the repairs that followed the 2006-2011 litigation.

“It’s kind of a unique situation,” said Charles Hipp, chairman of The Peninsula’s HOA board.

Hipp said he was unwilling to discuss the lawsuit that caught Davis by surprise because he was upset about unspecified aspects of previous reporting about The Peninsula’s problems.

In 2018, The Post and Courier reported that the residents of 19 condos there were ordered to temporarily evacuate just days before Christmas after structural engineers discovered damage that Charleston city officials said posed “an immediate threat to public safety.”

Hipp, whose company sells and rents real estate including condos at The Peninsula, said that despite the latest litigation complicating mortgage availability, condos are selling briskly.

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