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Platform Lifts in Sullivan's Island, SC

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30 Years of Making
Your Workday More Productive

They say that working smarter is better than working harder.Why not both?

Whether you're running a high-volume warehouse, overseeing a new construction project, or managing a busy retail establishment, you know that a productive workplace is essential. When it comes to your workplace equipment, you need tools that not only save time and money but are reliable when you need them the most and help your team get the job done right.

At Absolute E-Z Up, we help professionals overcome low productivity by providing the finest stock pickers, tire pickers, and platform lifts in Sullivan's Island, SC. If you need more efficiency and more profitability at your job site, you're in the right place. Sure, big-picture processes play an important role in your workplace. However, in our experience, the top cause of low productivity involves wasted time on the job site - avoidable problems that slow down your day-to-day work. And when your day-to-day and overall deadlines aren't achieved, that fault falls on you.

Platform Lifts Sullivan's Island, SC

Some of the most common productivity issues
we hear about include:

 Low Level Lift Sullivan's Island, SC
  • Low-capacity equipment that requires workers to make multiple trips to transport materials.
  • Unreliable equipment that breaks down again and again.
  • Workers on injury leave because of falls suffered from unsafe ladders or scaffolds.
  • Enlisting more manpower to fill in because you don't have the right equipment to get the job done.

If any of these problems sound familiar to you, you're probably wondering what in the world you can do to get back on track. That's where Absolute E-Z Up comes in - to give you the tools you need to be more productive and efficient, so you have peace of mind knowing your job will finish on time, the right way.

When we founded Absolute E-Z Up (AEUP), we created a plan to deliver safe, reliable work platforms, stock picker forklifts, inclined platform lifts, stair climbers, and material handling products that increase productivity by leaps and bounds. We're not talking a few minutes shaved off here or there. We mean upping your work cycles two to three times what you're used to, coupled with drastically reduced downtime from maintenance and repair.

Sound too good to be true?

Not at Absolute E-Z Up in Sullivan's Island, SC.

Contact Us

The Absolute E-Z Up Difference

Our company was founded on three basic values:

 Low Level Access Lifts Sullivan's Island, SC

Safety - The Top Time Booster

When workers are injured, they're either placed on light duty or leave until they heal up and get back to work. This leaves you with the conundrum do you hire a new worker (which requires an initial expense) or reassign members of your staff to make up the difference? Obviously, neither situation is optimal. The biggest factor preventing these kinds of frustrating situations is workplace safety, which is why it's our top priority at AEUP. It doesn't matter if you buy a manual platform lift in Sullivan's Island, SC, or an electric stock picker. You can rest easy when you purchase equipment from us, knowing that AEUP aerial work platforms and material handling equipment come with the most innovative safety technologies.

A few of those safety mechanisms include:

  • Anti-tilt systems, helping to prevent toppling and turnovers.
  • Built-in pothole protection for driving equipment.
  • Double-foot sensors, which halts the machine from operating unless two feet are planted on the sensors.

Note: Depending on your needs, your machinery may or may not include some of these safety technologies. Please refer to specific product pages for more details.

 Electric Utility Vehicle Sullivan's Island, SC

Productivity - Doing More with Less

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

  • Versatile - our equipment is more versatile than other options, giving you the ability to fit into small spaces with a zero turning radius.
  • Faster - our batteries change in only a few hours and can last for dozens if not hundreds of duty cycles.
  • More Efficient - Workers can speed up every part of the workday with special features, attachments, and deck extensions.
  • Lower Costs - You can maintain our equipment at lower costs, which saves you money when you need it most.
 Mini Utility Vehicle Sullivan's Island, SC

Reliability - Always There When You Need to Work Hard

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

Industrial Stock Pickers in Sullivan's Island, SC

Warehouse picking involves workers pulling (picking) items located on warehouse shelves and moving them down the line for shipment to customers. This kind of work requires a great deal of coordination, organization, and attention to detail. Filling orders under deadlines and time crunches are common. As such, you need a trustworthy stock picker that can boost efficiency and increase production time.

Managers often adjust their picking strategy to be less time-consuming and costly when the real answer might lie with the tools and machinery they're using. At AEUP, we provide the highest-quality stock pickers for your business so that your workers can do the job they need to do as quickly and safely as possible.

With AEUP, you can increase material handling efficiency in a variety of industries and workplaces. We're talking retail, warehouses, factories, and even event venues. The ISP series offers ideal solutions for diverse applications. The models feature a 35% gradeability for greater job-site accessibility.

  Stock Picker Lift Sullivan's Island, SC
We offer several pickers for different needs, including:
 Stock Picker Machine Sullivan's Island, SC

ISP-7M™

If affordable efficiency is your priority, this is the picker for you. With over a 13-foot working height, it will be the last "ladder" your business will need to use. The ISP-7M is one of the most versatile and affordable stock pickers on the market and is ideal for a variety of workplaces:

  • Airports
  • Warehouses
  • Retail Stores
  • Distribution Centers
  • Educational Buildings
  • Entertainment Venues

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

 Tire Picker Sullivan's Island, SC

ISP-11™

Industrial Stock Picker

If maximum versatility modern safety features matter most to you, the ISP-11™ will allow your team to work safer, faster, and with less strain on your workers. With this stock picker, you can increase safety, maximize uptime, and be able to adapt to any floorplan or warehouse layout. Durable, versatile, and low-maintenance, the AEUP ISP-11™ is a self-propelled stock picker that will modernize your material handling process.

  • Drive, rotate and elevate all at the same time. Most of our competitors can only do one of these functions at a time.
  • Closed canopy and damage-resistant carbon bumper.
  • Comes with an aluminum alloy mast cylinder column. That means you don' have to worry about motors or chains to maintain. Add to that a 5-year warranty, and you'll be working smarter and harder for years to come.
  • Our electric material trays are adjustable to any shelf height. Many such trays are not electric and can only adjust in six-inch increments. Instead of adjusting your whole machine due to a three-inch miscalculation, you can save time and frustration with the ISP-11.
  • Our double-foot sensor requires that both of your workers' heels maintain contact with the platform to drive. No more safety nightmares, like hanging over the edge to drive.

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

Platform Lifts Sullivan's Island, SC

ISP-11™ TTH

If you're in need of a tire picker in Sullivan's Island, SC, our tire transport handler is exactly what you need. Safe, efficient, and versatile, this picker has a working height of over 17 feet, giving you the ability to grab tires on the highest shelves. With tires getting bigger and heavier, it becomes necessary to prevent injuries during all operations involving them. The AEUP ISP-11 TTH lifts both the operator and tires, easily placing them at the desired height while allowing faster and safer performance. As if that weren't enough, this tire transport handler also comes with our stellar 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty.

A Warranty That's on Your Side When You Need It Most

Unlike other companies in our industry, we are proud to say that our warranty comes standard on all our equipment. Stock picker forklift in Sullivan's Island, SC? Check. Vertical lifts? Check. Inclined platform lifts? Check. But this isn't any warranty - it's the Absolute E-Z Up platinum manufacturer's warranty, which is why you can trust the quality of AEUP products. Our Platinum Warranties are part of our commitment to value, safety, and quality. When you work with us, we want you to be able to trust that your Absolute E-Z Up equipment is a reliable, smart, long-term asset to your business that saves you money and time.

Our warranty allows our customers to secure their long-term budgets by reducing maintenance and repair costs. Since each piece of machinery is different, your warranty should be customized for the equipment that you need.

 Low Level Lift Sullivan's Island, SC
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP Low-Level Access Series

No other elevated work platform or stock picker supplier has anything close to our 5-2-1 warranty. Here's what our warranty guarantees on our low-level access machinery:

  • 5 years on your mast assembly and cylinder
  • 2 years on all other components of your platform or stock picker.
  • 1 year on the lift's battery, which is not pro-rated.
  • Optional AEUP Extended 10-5-1 Warranty Service Coverage (ISPs)
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP EZ Climber Series

Customers choose our E-Z Climber series because it gives them years of dependable service, backed by a warranty that will replace any parts that fail, which minimizes production downtime. We are committed to covering labor costs for the first six months of your purchase. Our E-Z Climber Series warranty guarantees:

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of the machine.
  • 2 years of coverage on your electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the battery, which is not pro-rated.
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on Electric Utility Vehicles

Our electric utility vehicles give you years of dependable service, coupled with a powerful warranty that covers and service that will replace any parts that fail during your warranty period. If a part fails, we'll get it replaced quickly, to minimize downtime from work. Your labor rate is reimbursable and is covered for the first six months.

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of your EUV.
  • 2 years of coverage on the EUV's electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the EUV's battery, which is not pro-rated.

Ready to Get Productive?

At Absolute E-Z, our goal is to provide you with the highest quality transactions and product solutions in the safest manner possible. With the right equipment and mindset, we believe that work can be fun again, and we're here to help make that happen for you and your team. As such, our mission is to be the top provider of stock pickers and other warehouse equipment in Sullivan's Island. We make it a point to listen to our customer's needs and do everything in our power to uphold our reputation for excellence.

We'll do so by continuing to honor the commitment we made to ourselves and our customers from the very beginning - earning your respect and loyalty through continuous improvement driven by integrity, teamwork, and innovation.

If you're ready to take your workflow to the next level, we're only a click or call away.

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Low Level Access Lifts Sullivan's Island, SC

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

What is the record high temperature for each South Carolina county?

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 d...

HORRY COUNTY, S.C. (WBTW) — If you can’t take the heat…you might want to crank up your AC.

Every South Carolina county has reached at least 105 degrees since agencies began tracking temperatures, according to information from the South Carolina State Climatology Office. The state high was reached on June 29, 2021, at 113 degrees in Columbia.

The state’s lowest recorded temperature was -19 degrees, recorded on Jan. 21, 1985, in Caesars Head.

High temperatures are expected to continue in South Carolina this week following a heat advisory issued on Tuesday.

Wednesday, temperatures were expected to reach a high in the lower 90s, with weather cooling to the lower 70s at night in Horry County, according to the National Weather Service. The heat index could possibly reach 100 to 105 degrees on Friday in southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina.

On the cooler side, South Carolina’s 24-hour snowfall record was reached on Feb. 9-10, 1973, in Rimini, with 24 inches, according to the National Centers for Environmental Information. The deepest snow was recorded on Feb. 18, 1969, in Ceasars Head, at 29 inches.

The most rain was on Sept. 16, 1999, in Myrtle Beach, at 14.8 inches within 24 hours. Jocasee set a record for the most rain in a year in 2018, at 123.45 inches.

Here are the lowest temperatures recorded in each South Carolina county, according to the South Carolina State Climatology Office:

Abbeville County

Location: Calhoun Falls

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 8, 1925

Aiken County

Location: Aiken

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Allendale County

Location: Allendale

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Anderson County

Location: Anderson

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 29, 1952

Bamberg County

Location: Bamberg

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 24, 1952

Barnwell County

Location: Blackville

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Beaufort County

Location: Yemasse

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 3, 1985

Berkeley County

Location: Jamestown

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Calhoun County

Location: St. Matthews

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: July 27, 1914

Charleston County

Location: Sullivans Island

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: June 26, 1952

Cherokee County

Location: Ninety Nine Islands

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Chester County

Location: Chester

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 31, 1983

Chesterfield County

Location: Cheraw

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 19, 1986

Clarendon County

Location: Manning

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Colleton County

Location: Walterboro

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Aug. 17, 1954

Darlington County

Location: Darlington

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Dillon County

Location: Dillon

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 22, 1983

Dorchester County

Location: Summerville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: Sept. 21, 1925

Edgefield County

Location: Johnston

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Aug. 11, 2007

Fairfield County

Location: Winsboro

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 22, 1926

Florence County

Location: Florence

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Georgetown County

Location: Georgetown

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: June 30, 1990

Greenville County

Location: Hunts Bridge

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 10, 2007

Greenwood County

Location: Greenwood

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 19, 1913

Hampton County

Location: Hampton

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 13, 1980

Horry County

Location: Loris

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1952

Jasper County

Location: Ridgeland

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: June 27, 1950

Kershaw County

Location: Camden

Temperature: 111 degrees

Date: June 28, 1954

Lancaster County

Location: Kershaw

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1926

Laurens County

Location: Laurens

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: June 22, 1925

Lee County

Location: Bishopville

Temperature: 107 degrees

Date: July 27, 1940

Lexington County

Location: Columbia Metropolitan Airport

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: June 28, 2012

Marion County

Location: Marion

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: June 27, 1954

Marlboro County

Location: McColl

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Aug. 9, 2007

McCormick County

Location: Clarkhill

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: July 29, 1987

Newberry County

Location: Little Mountain

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 21, 1952

Oconee County

Location: Walhalla

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 7, 1925

Orangeburg County

Location: Orangeburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: Aug. 2, 1999

Pickens County

Location: Pickens

Temperature: 105 degrees

Date: Aug. 21, 1983

Richland County

Location: USC Columbia

Temperature: 113 degrees

Date: June 29, 2012

Saluda County

Location: Saluda

Temperature: 109 degrees

Date: Sept. 1, 1912

Spartanburg County

Location: Spartanburg

Temperature: 106 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

Sumter County

Location: Wedgefield

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Union County

Location: Santuck

Temperature: 110 degrees

Date: Sept. 4, 1925

Williamsburg County

Location: Kingstree

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 20, 1986

York County

Location: Winthrop University

Temperature: 108 degrees

Date: July 12, 1930

Count on News13 for all your latest weather coverage.

Copyright 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

New legislation could increase enforcement of state ethics fines

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.That’s about the same as when ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.

It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.

That’s about the same as when Live 5 Investigates reported on the debtors three years ago.

Ethics Commission Debtor’s list continues to grow

The latest to be added from the Lowcountry area are Angela McClary-Rush, a board member for Williamsburg Council Schools, Chris Lovelace, a former Colleton County Sheriff candidate and Timothy Reese, a council member on Sullivan’s Island.

Many remain on that list months and years after being added because getting them to pay up, doesn’t always pay off for the South Carolina Ethics Commission.

That’s because the state agency lacks the enforcement it needs, according to Sen. Greg Hembree (R-District 28).

“When you don’t have that ability to enforce the law. Then you really undermine the entire integrity of the system,” he said.

The Commission is charged with keeping politicians honest by enforcing state elections laws.

“We were way ahead of the country back in when we first passed them. We were like the lead, they had the best ethics laws in the country for a long time, but other states have caught us and now have passed us,” Hembree said. “For someone who just wants to thumb their nose at the law they can.”

Live 5 spoke with former Charleston County District 20 Constituent School Board chairman Tony Lewis in 2018 to ask about $61,210 owed to the ethics commission. Then he said he didn’t have a problem with being held accountable.

He’s currently listed as owing $60,955, making about a $300 difference.

When Live 5 Investigates followed up, he did say he had been making some payments until the pandemic hit.

But had a different tone, calling the fines “hellacious price tag” in response to a question if he would resume payments.

Lewis no longer holds his position on the board.

Candidates in smaller races report less help and resources, but higher fines

Henry Copeland ran for Charleston County School board in 2012 and ended up owing the ethics commission $7,500 dollars. What began as an initial late fee of $100, ended up snowballing with daily late fees.

He’s now on a payment plan from the Department of Revenue.

“It was a shock in the sense that was far more than I ever spent on the election,” he said. “I think it was a very stiff fine considering the fact we were talking about a missing a filing deadline and we may be talking about reporting maybe $2,000 worth of campaign contributions, but the law is the law. But there ought to be some opportunity in which to rectify a situation that had apparently gone to the other extreme.”

Running a smaller campaign, Copeland recalls little to no support available to him from the state.

We were also able to get in contact with Chris Lovelace who according to the ethics commission owes $31,100 in fines for his 2016 run for Colleton County Sheriff.

Lovelace was just added to the list this past month.

The ethics commission reports he missed several filing deadlines and used campaign funds for personal reasons including gas station, restaurant, and clothing store charges.

Lovelace denies wrongdoing and argues health issues put him at a disadvantage.

“All the campaign funds are accounted for. It’s just that, they weren’t reported on time, at the time frame they wanted. And again, I take responsibility for that. It’s nobody else’s responsibility but mine. But I think the $30,000 is excessive,” he said. “As far as the Ethics Commission, dealing with them, it’s left a sour taste in my mouth.”

Lovelace says he ran because he saw corruption within the department and wanted to do something positive for his community.

He’s currently appealing his case.

Lewis also complained that he wasn’t aware of procedure, and it wasn’t fair to charge him for something he didn’t know about.

“The paperwork is so discouraging from that standpoint that I can easily see where an average person would hesitate to get involved. It places doubt on my desire to run for political office again, " Copeland said.

Banned from holding office

Legislation is in the works that would prevent Copeland and all the others named on the list from running from office again, at least as long as they owe money.

Sen. Hembree of the Peedee area introduced Senate Bill 991 that would prevent candidates with outstanding debts from doing so.

“There was one that we had in Horry County some years ago with a high profile elected official who happened to be a friend of mine, you know, but this person just for whatever reason we’re just steadfastly refused to pay those funds and they got into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Hembree said. “This person continued to serve continue to run for election and continue to get reelected so and still no payment of fine. So I was that was how I became aware of the problem.”

The bill did make it to a subcommittee but ultimately did not pass this legislative session.

Hembree says the bill wasn’t fully ready but he’s hopeful they’ll hit the ground running next year.

“I think that if you want a system, that’s truly accountable. They’re going to have to be more people at the Ethics Commission,” Copeland said. “But they’re going to have to have more of an eye on how to catch the items that can be corrected and how to catch the items that are an abuse of the system, and how to tell the difference between the two.”

The Ethics Commission receives funds from the legislature, but the $2.6 million owed is intended to help keep the department operating.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Loggerheads Continue To Lay Eggs By The Dozen

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye NewsAt last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a...

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News

At last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a nearby dune where they would not be destroyed by the tide or emergency vehicles. Subsequent nests on the Isle of Palms have been laid at the 5A Access Path, the 9A Access Path and in Dewees Inlet near the 17 tee of the Links Golf Course. This fourth IOP nest is now incubating near the Property Owners’ Beach House in Wild Dunes. On Sullivan’s Island, the first nest was laid very close to the Breach Inlet Bridge at the Hunley Memorial Park. This is not even in the area where our volunteers patrol, but others reported seeing the tracks there on May 20. Those eggs were taken to Station 26 to be relocated.

This was an unusually large clutch of 156 eggs. The average number they lay is around 120 eggs. The second SI nest of the season was found near Station 15 not far from Fort Moultrie by Raye Ann Osborne and Joanne Staton on May 24. It is now incubating just northeast of the Station 16 Access Path. In South Carolina, the first nest of the season was laid at Lighthouse Island in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge where more loggerheads nest than anywhere north of Jacksonville, Florida.

As of May 26 there were 923 nests in our state. We are off to a good start and are looking forward to having a very good season. We are also protecting most of our nests from coyote predation with heavy plastic screening.

Here are season reminders that we would like everyone to be aware of to have a safe beach for our loggerheads in 2022:

• Lights Out at Dusk. Any lights that can be seen from the beach should be turned off from dusk to dawn between May 1 and Oct. 31. This is the law on both islands.

• Fill in Holes. Any hole on the beach can trap small hatchlings and also large nesting females.

• Turn off flashlights & don’t use flash photography. If you see a nesting turtle on the beach, stay back at least 50 feet and do not disturb her.

Report any stranded turtles, dead or alive, to (843) 697-8733 or (843) 886-6522. If it has orange paint on it, it has been documented and is awaiting burial. Follow the season at bergwerfgraphics.com or join us on Facebook at Island Turtle Team IOP & SI South Carolina.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

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