Skip to main content

Platform Lifts in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Ask us Anything
Platform Lifts-phone-nuber 843-388-2556

Quick Quote

30 Years of Making
Your Workday More Productive

They say that working smarter is better than working harder.Why not both?

Whether you're running a high-volume warehouse, overseeing a new construction project, or managing a busy retail establishment, you know that a productive workplace is essential. When it comes to your workplace equipment, you need tools that not only save time and money but are reliable when you need them the most and help your team get the job done right.

At Absolute E-Z Up, we help professionals overcome low productivity by providing the finest stock pickers, tire pickers, and platform lifts in Wadmalaw Island, SC. If you need more efficiency and more profitability at your job site, you're in the right place. Sure, big-picture processes play an important role in your workplace. However, in our experience, the top cause of low productivity involves wasted time on the job site - avoidable problems that slow down your day-to-day work. And when your day-to-day and overall deadlines aren't achieved, that fault falls on you.

Platform Lifts Wadmalaw Island, SC

Some of the most common productivity issues
we hear about include:

 Low Level Lift Wadmalaw Island, SC
  • Low-capacity equipment that requires workers to make multiple trips to transport materials.
  • Unreliable equipment that breaks down again and again.
  • Workers on injury leave because of falls suffered from unsafe ladders or scaffolds.
  • Enlisting more manpower to fill in because you don't have the right equipment to get the job done.

If any of these problems sound familiar to you, you're probably wondering what in the world you can do to get back on track. That's where Absolute E-Z Up comes in - to give you the tools you need to be more productive and efficient, so you have peace of mind knowing your job will finish on time, the right way.

When we founded Absolute E-Z Up (AEUP), we created a plan to deliver safe, reliable work platforms, stock picker forklifts, inclined platform lifts, stair climbers, and material handling products that increase productivity by leaps and bounds. We're not talking a few minutes shaved off here or there. We mean upping your work cycles two to three times what you're used to, coupled with drastically reduced downtime from maintenance and repair.

Sound too good to be true?

Not at Absolute E-Z Up in Wadmalaw Island, SC.

Contact Us

The Absolute E-Z Up Difference

Our company was founded on three basic values:

 Low Level Access Lifts Wadmalaw Island, SC

Safety - The Top Time Booster

When workers are injured, they're either placed on light duty or leave until they heal up and get back to work. This leaves you with the conundrum do you hire a new worker (which requires an initial expense) or reassign members of your staff to make up the difference? Obviously, neither situation is optimal. The biggest factor preventing these kinds of frustrating situations is workplace safety, which is why it's our top priority at AEUP. It doesn't matter if you buy a manual platform lift in Wadmalaw Island, SC, or an electric stock picker. You can rest easy when you purchase equipment from us, knowing that AEUP aerial work platforms and material handling equipment come with the most innovative safety technologies.

A few of those safety mechanisms include:

  • Anti-tilt systems, helping to prevent toppling and turnovers.
  • Built-in pothole protection for driving equipment.
  • Double-foot sensors, which halts the machine from operating unless two feet are planted on the sensors.

Note: Depending on your needs, your machinery may or may not include some of these safety technologies. Please refer to specific product pages for more details.

 Electric Utility Vehicle Wadmalaw Island, SC

Productivity - Doing More with Less

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

  • Versatile - our equipment is more versatile than other options, giving you the ability to fit into small spaces with a zero turning radius.
  • Faster - our batteries change in only a few hours and can last for dozens if not hundreds of duty cycles.
  • More Efficient - Workers can speed up every part of the workday with special features, attachments, and deck extensions.
  • Lower Costs - You can maintain our equipment at lower costs, which saves you money when you need it most.
 Mini Utility Vehicle Wadmalaw Island, SC

Reliability - Always There When You Need to Work Hard

Common sense might tell you it would be hard for workers to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Common sense might tell you it would be hard for a worker to do twice as much work as they used to. However, with the right equipment, it's very possible. Whether it's hanging signs, moving a piano, working on a construction site, or any of the other tasks that require a stock picker, you'll save time and complete tasks faster with Absolute E-Z Up. Our stock pickers, vertical lifts, and stair climbers are:

Industrial Stock Pickers in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Warehouse picking involves workers pulling (picking) items located on warehouse shelves and moving them down the line for shipment to customers. This kind of work requires a great deal of coordination, organization, and attention to detail. Filling orders under deadlines and time crunches are common. As such, you need a trustworthy stock picker that can boost efficiency and increase production time.

Managers often adjust their picking strategy to be less time-consuming and costly when the real answer might lie with the tools and machinery they're using. At AEUP, we provide the highest-quality stock pickers for your business so that your workers can do the job they need to do as quickly and safely as possible.

With AEUP, you can increase material handling efficiency in a variety of industries and workplaces. We're talking retail, warehouses, factories, and even event venues. The ISP series offers ideal solutions for diverse applications. The models feature a 35% gradeability for greater job-site accessibility.

  Stock Picker Lift Wadmalaw Island, SC
We offer several pickers for different needs, including:
 Stock Picker Machine Wadmalaw Island, SC

ISP-7M™

If affordable efficiency is your priority, this is the picker for you. With over a 13-foot working height, it will be the last "ladder" your business will need to use. The ISP-7M is one of the most versatile and affordable stock pickers on the market and is ideal for a variety of workplaces:

  • Airports
  • Warehouses
  • Retail Stores
  • Distribution Centers
  • Educational Buildings
  • Entertainment Venues

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

 Tire Picker Wadmalaw Island, SC

ISP-11™

Industrial Stock Picker

If maximum versatility modern safety features matter most to you, the ISP-11™ will allow your team to work safer, faster, and with less strain on your workers. With this stock picker, you can increase safety, maximize uptime, and be able to adapt to any floorplan or warehouse layout. Durable, versatile, and low-maintenance, the AEUP ISP-11™ is a self-propelled stock picker that will modernize your material handling process.

  • Drive, rotate and elevate all at the same time. Most of our competitors can only do one of these functions at a time.
  • Closed canopy and damage-resistant carbon bumper.
  • Comes with an aluminum alloy mast cylinder column. That means you don' have to worry about motors or chains to maintain. Add to that a 5-year warranty, and you'll be working smarter and harder for years to come.
  • Our electric material trays are adjustable to any shelf height. Many such trays are not electric and can only adjust in six-inch increments. Instead of adjusting your whole machine due to a three-inch miscalculation, you can save time and frustration with the ISP-11.
  • Our double-foot sensor requires that both of your workers' heels maintain contact with the platform to drive. No more safety nightmares, like hanging over the edge to drive.

This fantastic stock picker is light enough to be used on any surface. It is also very maneuverable, making it a great choice for any company that needs a safer working platform with the fewest mechanical parts. The ISP-7M comes with our industry-leading 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty and clocks in at almost half the price of electric stock pickers.

Platform Lifts Wadmalaw Island, SC

ISP-11™ TTH

If you're in need of a tire picker in Wadmalaw Island, SC, our tire transport handler is exactly what you need. Safe, efficient, and versatile, this picker has a working height of over 17 feet, giving you the ability to grab tires on the highest shelves. With tires getting bigger and heavier, it becomes necessary to prevent injuries during all operations involving them. The AEUP ISP-11 TTH lifts both the operator and tires, easily placing them at the desired height while allowing faster and safer performance. As if that weren't enough, this tire transport handler also comes with our stellar 5-2-1 Platinum Warranty.

A Warranty That's on Your Side When You Need It Most

Unlike other companies in our industry, we are proud to say that our warranty comes standard on all our equipment. Stock picker forklift in Wadmalaw Island, SC? Check. Vertical lifts? Check. Inclined platform lifts? Check. But this isn't any warranty - it's the Absolute E-Z Up platinum manufacturer's warranty, which is why you can trust the quality of AEUP products. Our Platinum Warranties are part of our commitment to value, safety, and quality. When you work with us, we want you to be able to trust that your Absolute E-Z Up equipment is a reliable, smart, long-term asset to your business that saves you money and time.

Our warranty allows our customers to secure their long-term budgets by reducing maintenance and repair costs. Since each piece of machinery is different, your warranty should be customized for the equipment that you need.

 Low Level Lift Wadmalaw Island, SC
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP Low-Level Access Series

No other elevated work platform or stock picker supplier has anything close to our 5-2-1 warranty. Here's what our warranty guarantees on our low-level access machinery:

  • 5 years on your mast assembly and cylinder
  • 2 years on all other components of your platform or stock picker.
  • 1 year on the lift's battery, which is not pro-rated.
  • Optional AEUP Extended 10-5-1 Warranty Service Coverage (ISPs)
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on AEUP EZ Climber Series

Customers choose our E-Z Climber series because it gives them years of dependable service, backed by a warranty that will replace any parts that fail, which minimizes production downtime. We are committed to covering labor costs for the first six months of your purchase. Our E-Z Climber Series warranty guarantees:

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of the machine.
  • 2 years of coverage on your electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the battery, which is not pro-rated.
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty
5-2-1 Platinum Warranty™ on Electric Utility Vehicles

Our electric utility vehicles give you years of dependable service, coupled with a powerful warranty that covers and service that will replace any parts that fail during your warranty period. If a part fails, we'll get it replaced quickly, to minimize downtime from work. Your labor rate is reimbursable and is covered for the first six months.

  • 5 years of coverage on the structural steel chassis of your EUV.
  • 2 years of coverage on the EUV's electrical components.
  • 1 year of coverage on the EUV's battery, which is not pro-rated.

Ready to Get Productive?

At Absolute E-Z, our goal is to provide you with the highest quality transactions and product solutions in the safest manner possible. With the right equipment and mindset, we believe that work can be fun again, and we're here to help make that happen for you and your team. As such, our mission is to be the top provider of stock pickers and other warehouse equipment in Wadmalaw Island. We make it a point to listen to our customer's needs and do everything in our power to uphold our reputation for excellence.

We'll do so by continuing to honor the commitment we made to ourselves and our customers from the very beginning - earning your respect and loyalty through continuous improvement driven by integrity, teamwork, and innovation.

If you're ready to take your workflow to the next level, we're only a click or call away.

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Low Level Access Lifts Wadmalaw Island, SC

Latest News in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Charleston County zoning proposal could limit public input surrounding mitigation banks

Wadmalaw Island residents and environmentalists are concerned that zoning changes proposed by Charleston County might slash the public process used to alter wetland boundaries and the vegetated buffers meant to protect them.For some time now, the county has had in place a 35-foot setback buffer on the so-called critical line that keeps impact away from marsh areas. To be able to encroach on that buffer for reasons such as adding a pool, deck or to excavate, owners would have to argue a hardship before the Board of Zoning Appeals, whic...

Wadmalaw Island residents and environmentalists are concerned that zoning changes proposed by Charleston County might slash the public process used to alter wetland boundaries and the vegetated buffers meant to protect them.

For some time now, the county has had in place a 35-foot setback buffer on the so-called critical line that keeps impact away from marsh areas. To be able to encroach on that buffer for reasons such as adding a pool, deck or to excavate, owners would have to argue a hardship before the Board of Zoning Appeals, which determines if a zoning variance is warranted.

But a proposed ordinance passed by County Council on first reading July 12 would give the zoning and planning director permission to make that determination for the creation of a mitigation bank.

Some critics say the move is related to the stalled mitigation bank planned on Wadmalaw Island and that it would cut out the public review process used to make these types of decisions.

The recent history dates to April 4 when county’s Board of Zoning Appeals denied two variance requests for the planned mitigation bank. Point Farm Investors LLC wanted the board to approve the removal of a grand live oak tree and allow encroachment into 1.3 acres of protected buffer next to tidal land.

The board voted unanimously to deny the requests because the property could still be used without variances.

But Mary Shahid, an attorney who represented the bank, said it could not be opened without zoning permissions, citing the need to breach berms that block tidal flow from coming in.

At a meeting later that month, County Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt asked for clarification on “what zoning amendments might need to be made to address any of that.”

Point Farm is being represented by American Mitigation Co., whose president, Ross Nelson, sits on the BZA and was appointed by Honeycutt.

The bank has appealed the decision in circuit court. But if the county changes the zoning ordinance, Point Farm can withdraw the appeal and reapply under the new rule “and it would be a staff approval and not a public approval,” Jason Crowley, Coastal Conservation League’s communities and transportation senior program director, said recently.

The county has a method for public notification.

Charleston County Zoning and Planning Director Joel Evans said there is a standing “parties of interest” list that people can join to be notified when an application for a house, a site plan review or something similar is submitted for a particular property. This process is applicable for decisions that are made administratively.

“We have several of those around where people just want to be notified,” Evans said. “They formally requested that we can put it in our system and notify them.”

There’s no “mass mail-out,” Evans said, but whoever alerts the county that they want to be notified, can be.

He said the county is also willing to put people on the list to be alerted when an application is submitted for a mitigation bank on a piece of property.

But there’s a difference between public notice and public input, said Councilman Dickie Schweers.

If Evans were to make an administrative decision regarding a mitigation bank, the only way an interested party could do anything about it would be through an appeal, which comes with a cost.

The council voted 5-3 to pass first reading of the ordinance July 12.

Council members Anna Johnson, Kylon Middleton and Schweers voted against the proposal; Councilman Henry Darby was absent.

“It seems like we’re being asked to sort of bail out a process that didn’t play out the way, obviously, the developer was planning for it to,” Councilman Robert Wehrman said.

He said he is open to hearing out the conversation regarding the ordinance.

The council can amend the proposal up until third reading.

Minero’s 2nd act provides space for new Johns Island restaurant to reach its full potential

For those who frequented Minero during its tenure on East Bay Street, driving from downtown Charleston to Johns Island for charcoal-grilled chicken wings, cheese-crusted burritos and catfish tacos might not feel right.That is until you pull into the spacious gravel parking lot and walk through the large covered patio to the hostess stand where you’ll put your name in the queue. A wait is almost guaranteed — especially as the new restaurant works through an industry-wide staffing shortage — but Johns Islanders and oth...

For those who frequented Minero during its tenure on East Bay Street, driving from downtown Charleston to Johns Island for charcoal-grilled chicken wings, cheese-crusted burritos and catfish tacos might not feel right.

That is until you pull into the spacious gravel parking lot and walk through the large covered patio to the hostess stand where you’ll put your name in the queue. A wait is almost guaranteed — especially as the new restaurant works through an industry-wide staffing shortage — but Johns Islanders and others who made the drive on June 22 didn’t seem to mind.

Some formed a short line at the indoor-outdoor bar for a margarita or pint from nearby breweries Estuary Beans & Barley and Low Tide Brewery. Others gathered outside, where there’s plenty of room to roam.

The new compound is a far cry from the tight downtown quarters Minero occupied from 2014 to 2020, a venue that required patrons to walk up steep stairs to a small, albeit quaint, dining room. Now, it takes just a couple steps for the up to 175 people that Minero can seat indoors and out to order the dishes and drinks that gained a following during its downtown days.

While the original Minero was wildly popular, the new space offers the restaurant room to reach its full potential with a lively ambiance that pairs with new and exciting flavors from executive chef Shamil Velazquez.

‘The guests know this food’

Velazquez isn’t new to the Charleston area. For three years, the Puerto Rican-born chef has been demonstrating his ability to deliver sophisticated, elegant food in a casual setting at Delaney Oyster House on Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston. Before that, he helmed the kitchen at a now-closed Husk outpost in Greenville, where he served the hyper-local Southern cuisine that’s become synonymous with the restaurant first opened by Sean Brock.

So we know Velazquez has range in the kitchen, but recreating Minero’s favorites presented a new challenge for the chef.

“The guests know this food, they know what they’re looking for, they know what it tastes like,” Velazquez said. “So I have to make sure it looks and tastes exactly the same as they had it so that food memory recall can just activate when they take that first bite of that wing or that catfish taco.”

Velazquez credited Minero chef de cuisine Teikel Stafford for helping with the transition. Stafford was a part of the opening team at the original Minero back in 2014, making him the ideal candidate to lead day-to-day operations on Johns Island, giving Velazquez the flexibility he needs to also lead the kitchen at Delaney Oyster House. Charcoal grilled wings tossed in Valentina hot sauce ($16), burritos ($13-$19) and the beef and chorizo double cheeseburger ($17) are among the options that returned to Minero when it opened in June.

Minero’s menu of seemingly rudimentary appetizers and entrees are anything but, starting with the tacos. Corn and flour tortillas are made in-house, a two-day endeavor. Right now, the kitchen is churning out more than 300 of each daily for fried catfish, al pastor, chicken, steak and cauliflower tacos (2 for $11, 3 for $16).

“We’re just striving for the best quality taco we can possibly provide to the guest,” Velazquez said. “It’s definitely been the most challenging thing to do even though it seems like the simplest.”

Labor of love

Tortillas aren’t the only labor of love at Minero. Others hint at Velazquez’ upbringing in Santa Juanita, Bayamón, located on the outskirts of San Juan. Eating empanadas was a near-daily occurrence for Velazquez during his youth in Puerto Rico. But the fried and filled savory turnovers weren’t initially slated for Minero’s menu, despite the success of his Caribbean beef empanadas at Delaney Oyster House.

Velazquez and his team instead set out to serve taquitos — a tightly rolled fried taco of sorts — but the cooking process was drying out the pork filling.

They turned to the empanadas ($15), one of Minero’s top sellers since its opening.

“We wanted to have some sort of fritter on the menu, and empanadas were at the bottom of the list just because they are very labor intensive,” Velazquez said. “We get to roast the pork for 24 hours the Puerto Rican way; Puerto Rican with a couple little Mexican flavors in there.”

The crispy kan kan pork tomahawk ($44) also combines Puerto Rican and Mexican flavors. Drawing on the popular island combination of pork and guava, Velazquez brines a custom-cut of pork before marinating it with sofrito, a paste-like sauce commonly made of onions, peppers, garlic, cilantro and other ingredients, depending on the chef. The colossal chop is then par-baked, fried and tossed in a guava barbecue sauce and served with avocado, sweet plantains, red rice and beans.

“It’s a lengthy process, but I think it’s worth every penny. It’s definitely something you have got to get used to because the skin is not something that everybody’s into,” Velazquez said, discussing the crisp, chewy skin that develops around the edge of the chop. “For me personally, gnawing on the skin and all that, it reminds me a lot of home and my childhood.”

The few flashes of Puerto Rican influence fit at Minero, and that’s by design. Velazquez’ detailed approach to the menu combines a desire to draw on nostalgic tastes while staying true to the Minero concept.

“I’m obviously not Mexican. I didn’t grow up with that culture, but it’s very similar in the sense that Mexico is also all about sharing and using the best resources around you to create something delicious to share with your family,” Velazquez said. “That resonates well with me, and that’s why I’m able to put some of my dishes and crossover between the two.”

Perfecting the process

Nearly half of Minero’s seats are located on the covered patio, separated from the dining room by an open garage door, where the bar is located. An outdoor overflow space is equipped with cornhole boards and benches, allowing patrons to have a place to sip on a drink from the bar while they wait for a table.

Having ample outdoor space was a big priority, said General Manager Kevin King, who joined Minero after previously leading day-to-day operations at Husk.

“We were definitely expecting to be busy so we wanted a place for people to feel comfortable,” King said, discussing the bar. “We have the garage door open, so you have that nice open feel.”

Speaking of the bar — King developed a cocktail menu that draws on the original Minero with a few new twists. The Minero Margarita ($13) is served as it once was, with reposado and añejo tequilas, fresh lime, orange juice, curaçao and agave. Between that, Minero’s do-it-yourself margarita and a “lite” variation served with blanco tequila, lime and sparkling water, King says they are selling quite a few margaritas.

The entire cocktail menu, which also features a frosé sangria ($10) and other boozy beverages, is void of sugar. Instead, King steeps lime husks in agave to create what’s called a lime cordial that adds citrus and sweetness to many of the drinks.

Minero is a big place, and diners might notice empty tables if they visit in the coming weeks. It’s a prime example of why patience and kindness are key in today’s dining landscape. King said decisions on how many tables the restaurant can handle are made daily with the goal of not overextending the staff.

“There’s a huge demand for the space,” King said. “You can do as much training as you want, but when it comes time for game time, we have to be on it.”

So far, getting enough business to dial in their process has not been a problem, as a line of excited diners usually forms just before 4 p.m. Wednesday though Sunday, the days Minero is currently open.

That line could get even longer and more frequent once the business reaches full capacity, allowing for the addition of its highly anticipated lunch and brunch services.

Foodie Friday Comfortable Balls (Boozy Cookies)

This recipe was born out of a request by a former Broome County Undersheriff for rum balls. I obliged with the typical holiday cookie but thought about how I could do an original take with different ingredients. I’m really not sure what possessed me to think of Southern Comfort for the alcohol instead of rum. I’ve never been a fan, but the idea of a whiskey led to thinking a good flavor pair would be molasses and ginger from ginger snap cookies and we were off to the races for "Comfortable Balls!"You can experime...

This recipe was born out of a request by a former Broome County Undersheriff for rum balls. I obliged with the typical holiday cookie but thought about how I could do an original take with different ingredients. I’m really not sure what possessed me to think of Southern Comfort for the alcohol instead of rum. I’ve never been a fan, but the idea of a whiskey led to thinking a good flavor pair would be molasses and ginger from ginger snap cookies and we were off to the races for "Comfortable Balls!"

You can experiment with other cookies and alcohol pairings if you wish.

I had to do a little tweaking of the recipe since a trial batch using my original notes came out too wet and the cookies wouldn’t hold the ball shape.

COMFORTABLE BALLS (boozy cookies) (Prep. Time about an hour including chilling time. Makes about 35 cookies depending on how big you like your balls)

21 ounces hard ginger snap cookies (about one and a half 14 oz bags) finely crushed. Hang on to the other half bag if you find your balls are too wet to handle even after chilling (Quit sniggering!)

1 1/2 C. confectioner’s sugar

1 Tb light corn syrup

1 Tb honey

1 tsp. Vanilla extract

1/2 C. Southern Comfort

1/2 C. Granulated sugar plus 1 Tb. Ground cinnamon for coating.

Mix everything together but cinnamon sugar and chill 30 minutes. The dough will be very wet until it has a chance to soak up the liquids. Spoon out 1 tsp. at a time. Roll between palms into a ball. If the chilled dough is too wet to hold a ball shape, you can crush more cookies and add them in. It's okay to have them a little soft and moist but you don't want them spreading flat when you put them on a sheet to chill or when you are ready to serve. Roll each ball in the cinnamon sugar to lightly coat. Place on sheet lined with parchment and chill at least another hour. If flattened out, gently roll back into balls and coat with another layer of cinnamon sugar. (But, honestly, once someone eats one of these hooch-laced honeys, they really won't care how flat they are!) Keep cold until ready to serve.

They can be stored in a tight-lidded container with layers separated by wax paper or throw them in a freezer bag with a little granulated sugar to keep them from sticking together, press the air out and seal. I don't know how long it takes for the alcohol to evaporate, so I wouldn't store them for more than a few days.

(If you know anything about adult campers, you know they like their liquor. So, when it came to the idea of a dessert exchange at the campground I steered right to the booze!)

Charleston Co. Schools presents plan for new elementary school on Johns Island

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) – Charleston County School District staff members presented new information and a possible plan to build a new elementary school on Johns Island Thursday night.The district has allocated $41 million in taxpayer dollars to build the new campus, according to the school district’s 2023-2028 Capital Building Program.The school will be built on River Road, between Brownswood and Murraywood roads. As it stands, the district says they will have to put in a roundabout at the River Road entrance of th...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) – Charleston County School District staff members presented new information and a possible plan to build a new elementary school on Johns Island Thursday night.

The district has allocated $41 million in taxpayer dollars to build the new campus, according to the school district’s 2023-2028 Capital Building Program.

The school will be built on River Road, between Brownswood and Murraywood roads. As it stands, the district says they will have to put in a roundabout at the River Road entrance of this new school near Swygert Boulevard.

Several parents say they are worried about the impact on traffic, but others were worried about equity. The district’s chief financial officer, Jeff Borowy, says the school will ease overcrowding at Angel Oak and Mount Zion elementary schools.

“We have multiple children that are in trailers,” Borowy said. “They’re still a good educational environment but certainly not as good as a permanent building, and so this project will give us the opportunity to bring kids in from the classroom trailers.”

As part of the new school, the district is looking to establish a single attendance zone for elementary students on the island and change the grade configurations.

Students in Head Start through first grade would go to Angel Oak Elementary, while students in second through fifth grades attend the new school. Mount Zion Elementary would be turned into a family center under this proposal.

“It would give every child on Johns Island an opportunity to be at the new school in grades 2 through 5,” Borowy said.”

A big talking point among parents was the potential impact the school will have on traffic.

“We do need a new school, especially our Mount Zion kids, but also, it’s just the location of where they’re going to have it,” Keiaunta Alexander said. “How are we going to fight this traffic when we already have more traffic?”

However, other parents were worried about how the school’s proposed change to grades will affect education.

“Having Mount Zion being a Title I school and all the extra resources that go to that Title I school, just want to make sure that when we combine schools and have those different age levels that our children who are living below the poverty line are still getting equal access and getting resources they still continue to need...,” Casey Thaler said.

Officials say they need to come back with recommendations on possible changes to the board of trustees in August.

The district says they expect construction to be completed on this new school in the summer of 2024.

In its 2023-2028 plan, the district has funded over $410 million consisting of several new buildings and expansions to current schools.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Wadmalaw residents want DHEC to reverse permit allowing destruction of freshwater wetlands

WADMALAW ISLAND — Residents here are concerned that a planned wetland mitigation bank near the Leadenwah Creek would introduce salt into freshwater habitat for a number of animals, including the threatened American wood stork.The plan by Point Farm, MB LLC is meant to enhance and restore tidal salt marsh on more than 2,000 acres in Charleston County, the company said in a permit application to the state. It plans to remove earthen dikes that have held back ocean water from fresh wetlands.The proposal would change an alrea...

WADMALAW ISLAND — Residents here are concerned that a planned wetland mitigation bank near the Leadenwah Creek would introduce salt into freshwater habitat for a number of animals, including the threatened American wood stork.

The plan by Point Farm, MB LLC is meant to enhance and restore tidal salt marsh on more than 2,000 acres in Charleston County, the company said in a permit application to the state. It plans to remove earthen dikes that have held back ocean water from fresh wetlands.

The proposal would change an already salty pond to tidal salt marsh, turn 10.14 acres of freshwater impoundments brackish and expand 20.60 acres of tidal salt marsh and creeks into currently impounded ponds. Regulators at the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have approved a permit for the work already.

In a news release, Wadmalaw Island residents John and Marilynn Hill said they are concerned that the only justification for the project’s potential damage appears to be the creation of a “multimillion-dollar windfall profit” from an investor group from Georgia that is creating the mitigation bank.

But the American Mitigation Co., which represents Point Farm, said in a statement that destruction of marsh will not occur, and the project will not adversely affect protected species, including the wood stork.

“From the onset of this project, American Mitigation Company has endeavored to create a unique salt marsh restoration project that is consistent with the conservation goals of the Wadmalaw Island community,” wrote Ross Nelson, the company’s president.

Last week, the South Carolina Environmental Law Project filed a formal request asking DHEC’s board to review the permit and reverse the choice of staff to let the work go forward. The law project is representing the Wadmalaw Island Land Planning Committee, Coastal Conservation League and residents of the sea island.

These groups believe there are issues with the project. First, the creation of the mitigation bank would convert freshwater wetlands, a functioning habitat, to saltwater wetlands without a real need.

Wadmalaw Island already contains very little freshwater. Places on the island with freshwater wetlands have functioned for hundreds of years as important habitats for wading birds and other wildlife, according to Jason Crowley, Coastal Conservation League’s communities and transportation senior program director. These areas were former rice impoundments.

“You’re taking away important habitat on the island for the personal profit of this commercial enterprise,” Crowley said.

Secondly, by only protecting a 50-foot strip of high ground next to the marshy mitigation bank, the property would be at risk of stormwater runoff if development happens close by, Crowley said.

The third concern is that the area is low-lying and susceptible to sea level rise and marsh migration. Crowley said the narrow buffer won’t allow the marsh to move far as sea levels rise.

“That whole bank that people bought credits for to offset their unavoidable impacts somewhere else is at risk of degradation and disappearance in the future because of the issues of sea level rise and uplands development,” Crowley said.

Nelson, in his statement, countered that the mitigation company is proud to have created a project that will result in the restoration of salt marsh and protection of developable lands in the buffer.

“The conservation easement for the bank has been recorded, and the uplands adjacent to the restored marsh are now protected from future development,” Nelson said.

Mitigation banks are private commercial entities that are meant to offset wetland destruction elsewhere. Federal law requires building projects to avoid harming wetlands. And if that isn’t possible, developers must pay to create more wetlands in the same watershed where the old ones were destroyed.

Mitigation banks do this work in advance, and entities can buy credits from them equal to the amount of the lost wetlands.

The Point Farm bank on Wadmalaw has support already from at least one buyer. In November 2020, Charleston County Council voted to purchase mitigation credits from the completed bank, to offset impacts from transportation improvement projects paid for by the county’s 2016 transportation sales tax. Among those projects is the effort to extend Interstate 526 through Johns and James Islands.

In a report, the county Finance Committee touted the proposed mitigation bank as the largest salt marsh restoration project of its kind in South Carolina.

“The bank will improve water quality, lessen the effects of flooding and sea level rise, and provide environmental improvements that offset the impacts of several critical road construction projects,” according the November 2020 committee report.

But John Taylor Jr., vice chair of the Wadmalaw Island Land Planning Committee, said the bank developer’s plan would not only destroy wildlife habitat but also a public resource used for fishing, boating and recreation. Once the bank is created, it is unclear if the public would have access to the area for recreation.

“We urge the board to overturn this permit in order to protect the interests of our community and the interests of all South Carolinians,” Taylor said in a news release.

Permitting for the Point Farm bank began in 2017, and plans to restore and preserve the salt marsh have been reviewed and approved by agencies including the Army Corps of Engineers, National Marine Fisheries Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, DHEC and the state Department of Natural Resources, according to the American Mitigation Co.

DHEC issued its permit on March 2. A DHEC spokeswoman said the agency typically does not comment on pending requests to review permit decisions.

The agency’s board has 60 days to respond to the Law Project’s request to review the mitigation bank permit with DHEC’s board.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.